McGarvey Septs of Ulster

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Mirior vs Morior

Posted by Jamie McGarvey on December 31, 2009 at 8:33 PM

I have seen the question raised before as to whether the Motto for the Garvey/McGarvey Coat of Arms was "Mirior Invictus" or "Morior Invictus". If you look in the Coat of Arms section you will find that it was registered at different times both ways. One has to remember that different individuals registered the motto and therefore the difference.

Now being that this particular Coat of Arms is a Sept Coat of Arms some research might have to be done to see what the original spelling was.

Below are the English meanings from the Latin words:

                      

                    "Mirior"

miracula : miraculum : a miracle play.

miraculose : miraculously.

mire : wonderfully, mervellously, uncommonly.

mirifice : wonderfuly, marvelously, extraordinarily

miro : to wonder.

miror : to marvel at, admire, wonder.

mirus : wonderful, astonishing, extraordinary

 

                  "Morior"

mora : delay

moratlis : mortal.

morbus : sickness, disease, illness.

mores, morium : ways, conduct, character, morals.

morior : to die, wither away, decay.

mors mortis : death.

morsus : a biting, bite, also, sting, pain.

mortalitas : the state of being mortal/ death, a dying

mortifera : deadly things

mortuus : dead, deceased, passed away, gone West, departed.

 

 "More Wonderfull Unconquered" or " Even in Death Unconquered (I die Unconquered)"

maybe someday someone will find the correct spelling.

 

Jamie.

 

 

 

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3 Comments

Reply Chris Garvey
2:02 AM on December 4, 2010 
Comparative degree (Gradus comparativus)

The comparative degree expresses a higher quality of thing or person as compared with the same quality of other things or persons. It is formed by adding the suffixes ?ior for masculine & feminine and ?ius for neuter to the stem of adjectives (obtained from the genitive form without its ending):
from:
http://www.orbilat.com/Languages/Latin/Grammar/Latin-Adjective.ht
ml
Reply Geoffrey Garvey
9:31 PM on November 3, 2013 
I've argued with my nephew Tom, a classics professor, about this issue. He is on the morior side because it is logical and I am on the mirior side because I expect the family's taste for irony is hereditary. To find it marvelous to finally be unconquered seems like a very Garvey sort of attitude to me.
Reply Jamie McGarvey
9:26 PM on November 4, 2013 
Geoffrey Garvey says...
I've argued with my nephew Tom, a classics professor, about this issue. He is on the morior side because it is logical and I am on the mirior side because I expect the family's taste for irony is hereditary. To find it marvelous to finally be unconquered seems like a very Garvey sort of attitude to me.

Hi Geoffrey,
Thank you for the comments. It is a very Garvey sort of attitude.
Regards,
Jamie.